Court Lane were a long-serving club from the 1950s but ran into player problems in the early 80s and sadly ended up folding. 

The Durrant family, led by their father Len and ably assisted by his sons Barry and Kim, played a big part in the 70s and early 80s.

As a player, Len Durrant was involved with De Harilands, who were a formidable outfit in their time. Barry and Kim took over the reigns when their dad retired.

Roy Pridham was a good steady goalkeeper, while Chris Hore joined them after playing for Waterlooville in the Hampshire League.

Roger Ough was joined by Kelvin Finch, who also had Hampshire League experience and was a very talented player.

Up front the goals came from Bob Tutton, Bobby Fear and Terry Smith while on the flanks I recall Jimmy Butler – a nippy winger – and Paul Collis on the opposite wing.

Almost at the end of their days in the league they recruited a number of Iranian lads who were studying at the University of Portsmouth.

One lad in particular proved to be a real find as he adapted well to the physical side of the game. His name was Tino Van de Vyer and he made an impression with his goal scoring ability. I have often wondered what he did when he had finished his course.

Another long-serving club who were definitely playing league football after the  Second World War were Portsmouth Nalgo.

They are one of only three clubs still around today – the others being Carberry and Ventora.

Nalgo, like Court Lane, had player problems in the lead up to the start of the 1983 season, but to the rescue came Barry Campbell.

Already a player with the club,  he managed to recruit a host of others – which enabled them not only to survive but form another team in Junior V.

Barry is one of those dedicated people every club needs. A fantastic person, he leaves nothing to chance.

His organisation is so precise, for while running the Saturday side he is also involved in Sunday football and a youth side.

All his dedication and hard work has been recognised by the Hampshire FA, who presented him with a meritorious medal for 47 years service to football – an honour richly deserved.

Nalgo in the 50s played on a pitch within Southsea Castle, now sadly long gone. When I first started writing a column for the Sports Mail, they were a Premier Division side and included players such as John Huddleston, Jim Feast and Bob Patey, along with Gerry Goddard and winger Dave Hill.

SM Mar 28th 1981_0002

In season 1981-82 a certain Ray Crawford, the former Pompey, Ipswich and England striker played six games and scored four goals – proving even in his 40s he still knew where the goal was.

Campbell has told me on December 27, 1947, Portsmouth Nalgo played Manchester United in a friendly at Fratton Park. I wonder if anyone out there can remember going to this game or provide any further details of this extraordinary encounter?

THE SCOUT

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